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The Prince and the “Paki”

Prince Harry has got himself into hot water once again. One of the Sunday newspapers published a transcript of a home video filmed in 2006 when he was an officer in the cadets. In it he calls fellow cadet Ahmed Raza Khan a “paki”. In the UK “paki” is a racist and derogatory term used to describe people who come from Pakistan.
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In another part of the video he calls another cadet “raghead”, which is army slang for Taliban and al-Qaida fighters.
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It was filmed in front of other cadets at in an airport, as they waited for a flight to Cyprus to go on manoeuvres. The newspaper says that the prince — who’s third in line to the throne — called the soldier “our little Paki friend.”
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Since this all came to light, the Prince has apologised for the comment.

He’d previously had to apologise in 2005 for wearing a swastika armband to a party — which offended many Jewish people.

What this whole thing shows is that no amount of charity work in Africa can take away how out of touch the Royal Family is when is comes to race relations. Hence why the Prince would have thought it was okay to use such a disgustingly racist term in front of other people.

The upper classes in Europe live in their own parallel universe which is set apart from the rest of we minions. There are very few ethnic minorities and lower classes in their social circles, so they remain very out of touch. Which is why Prince Harry using “paki” isn’t a surprise to me — the boy probably uses terms like that everyday, hence why it just slipped out of his mouth so easily…. even if it was meant to be in jest.

Although people who don’t live in the UK tend to be quite starry-eyed when it comes to the Royal family, it still reflects the huge class divide we have. People will immediately call it a race divide but it’s not, it’s about class and “breeding”. A chick from a council estate in South London couldn’t marry into the Royal family, anymore than a black girl could. It’s not the “done thing”.

So while other countries get excited about the Queen or Prince William passing through their shores, for a lot of us it represents an untouchable world that will forever.

—Miss London

Like Miss London’s perspective from across the way? Read the rest of her posts here.

To get your view from across the pond, Miss London Party will be your guide. Every week, she’ll be casting her eye over the big stories happening with the Brits. From fashion to entertainment to current affairs to politics, she’s got you covered. A Londoner born and bred, she’s worked as a journalist for two of the UK’s biggest broadcasters, and is currently presenting daily TV news — so she’ll be giving you an inside view on events. In her free time, she likes sitting in the pub on a Sunday afternoon, going through the newspapers, drinking a glass (actually a bottle) of wine, and tucking into a good ol’ English roast. Cliched, but true! She plays netball, swims and is ever so slightly addicted to trashy US shows on her cable TV.


Last 5 posts by Miss London

  • Guywithglasses

    Raghead is inexcusable. But I’ve heard Paki used in non-derogatory way by Americans and Canadians of various decent. Its one of those, if you are close with the person and depending on the scene when said, then it might acceptable (ie. Bitch).

    Truth be told, among soliders, like with sports teammates, if outsides were to take a peek into their conversations, things might be taken out of context. Among mates things are regularly said that could be perceived as racist/prejudice, if they would be taken out of context.

    Prince Harry is known for being inappropriate and I have no doubt that his status and family are directly related to his seemingly racist and pretentious comments. I’m sure we’ll he many more inappropriate things from his mouth before night falls.