/ / /

Should Fat People Be Treated On The NHS?

Self-delusion is an obese person's greatest problem, says Amanda

The Health Service in the UK works differently to America. It’s not private healthcare – essentially we get it for free, that’s why it’s called the National Health Service (NHS). It’s paid for through our taxes. But of course you can opt for private healthcare if you want to.

A few days ago new figures were published which said that the number of patients being treated for being grossly overweight has gone up sevenfold in the last 10 years, in the past year that number’s gone up by 30%. So essentially my hard earned taxes are being used so that people can have stomach stapling, anti-obesity drugs, gastric bypasses and other weight-loss treatments… if they’re grossly obese.

Now here’s the thing, I put weight loss treatments on par with breast enlargements or nose jobs. Not essential, just cosmetic — hence why you’ve got to pay privately for that stuff. But stomach stapling? Er… No.

The cost to the tax-payer because people can’t resist that 8th cream cake of the day is about $90m. The “politically correct” way of dealing with obesity is that you have to help those who can’t help themselves. Now apart from a few extreme cases, the fact still remains that people are fat because they eat too much and never exercise. So why should I have to pay for that? Like most women reaching their 30s, food has more on an affect on my body than it used to. So I have to cut certain things out and make sure that I hit the gym twice a week. I take control.

Which is why it gets on my nerves that my taxes are being spent in this way, when things like expensive cancer drugs etc. are being rationed on the NHS (although we don’t actually pay for the treatment, the hospitals still have to buy in the drugs). If it’s a case of people not knowing what foods make them fat, then educate them. Although how someone doesn’t realise a diet  made up purely of Macdonalds, KFC, Pizza Hut, fish and chips, and Chinese take-out makes you fat — is beyond me.

—Miss London

To get your view from across the pond, Miss London Party will be your guide. Every week, she’ll be casting her eye over the big stories happening with the Brits. From fashion to entertainment to current affairs to politics, she’s got you covered. A Londoner born and bred, she’s worked as a journalist for two of the UK’s biggest broadcasters, and is currently presenting daily TV news — so she’ll be giving you an inside view on events. In her free time, she likes sitting in the pub on a Sunday afternoon, going through the newspapers, drinking a glass (actually a bottle) of wine, and tucking into a good ol’ English roast. Cliched, but true! She plays netball, swims and is ever so slightly addicted to trashy US shows on her cable TV.

Like Miss London’s perspective from across the way? Read the rest of her posts here.

Last 5 posts by Miss London

  • i was going to agree that weight-loss treatments should not be covered; however, i realized that you listed medical procedures for people, the morbidly obese, that could not lose weight otherwise. most people that are overweight, whether 15 or 100 lbs, do not just jump to having surgery. if you had said lipo, then by all means, be up in arms but gastric bypass or stapling is a legimate medical intervention that should be covered. shouldn’t insulin be covered for diabetics even though a good majority of them could have monitored their sugar intake and prevented a full onset of diabetes?