Mission Accomplished

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Last Friday, May 1st, marked the sixth anniversary of the day George W. Bush announced that the “major combat operations have ended” and that “in the battle of Iraq, the United States and our allies have prevailed.”

Clearly he was wrong, though he tried his best to clean it up. My response then and now? Tell that to the 4284 American soldiers who have died in Iraq, and their 681 counterparts in Afghanistan, and the estimated 668,051 Iraqi civilians and the 7,373 Afghanis who have lost their lives during this conflict.

I’m not gonna preach, ’cause I’ve done that plenty (Smells Like Desperation, Crime and Punishment, Now What), but one way to nudge us toward advocating is to be sure that we don’t forget. It’s especially important now as President Obama continues to lead us into war.

Click here to see the fateful speech. How did you feel when you heard Dubbya make this pronouncement? How do you feel watching Obama expand our war efforts into Afghanistan?

—Kenrya

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Last 5 posts by kenrya

  • Diane

    But what about Pakistan. Nuclear. Pretty much succumbing to Taliban control. Not a pretty scenario – and one the major powers are going to have get involved in – some way, somehow. This will become our problem (we’re already over there observing Pakistani troop training).

    Why? Because they allowed this to happen. Because of Iraq and Afghanistan (and the first Gulf War). They nurtured the Taliban, gave Al Qaeda relevance. The US didn’t do what it needed to in the early 90s, nor in the 21st century. They didn’t apply the hard lessons of Korea, Vietnam – to the present situation. You can’t play middle-of-the-road and think you’ll win. If you’re going to get involved, get involved to defeat the the opponent.

    After listening to the the CNN interview with a ‘high-ranking’ Taliban official in Afghanistan (more tonight on Anderson…), who in effect said they’d be targeting any/all who involve themselves with the upcoming elections – and civilians should stay far away from polling places – and since we have not been able to sniff them out… it is reminiscent of the Revolution.

    Let me explain: Patriots were a minority in the colonies. They should have been defeated. Were being defeated. But the British didn’t count on their spunk and resilience. The British did not adapt to their style of fighting/warring (learned from the Natives during the French/Indian War – that the Brits disregarded). The British felt they were ‘right’ and they would prevail. They were arguably the most powerful country in the world. But the fighting was not on their own turf, nor near their homeland. The British public was not as involved. We know the outcome.

    Now insert US/allies for Brits, and Taliban for Patriots. Or North Vietnamese for Patriots. And I could stretch it for North Koreans…

    It’s so repetitive.

    Finally, had we taken Yemen’s offer – that of handing over Bin Laden in, I believe, 1993 or 1994 , when they had him (and we could have prosecuted him for World Trade Center bombing), we may have squelched a smoldering ember. Instead, Clinton declined, and the smoldering became what it is today.

    Well, this was a cheery post. But it’s how I feel. What I see. And I don’t see an out yet.